Gum and Bone Grafting
GUM GRAFTNG
Most Americans over the age of 50 have receding gums. Receding gums are caused by a variety of reasons, from heavy tartar buildup and gum disease to improper brushing techniques. Thankfully, even extensive recession can be repaired.

Dr. Javadi is a Chao Pinhole® Surgical Technique certified periodontist. The Pinhole technique is a minimally invasive procedure offering less discomfort and post-operative pain. It allows Dr. Javadi to move healthy gum tissue in to the treatment area using a small pinhole incision rather than making a large incision and grafting tissue taken from the roof of the mouth. The procedure does not require any sedation, and patients typically return to their normal routine immediately.

By offering AlloDerm® grafts, Dr. Javadi provides a predictable, less traumatic alternative for esthetic gingival grafting. AlloDerm® is donated tissue that has been processed to remove cells, creating a regenerative tissue matrix which Dr. Javadi uses for gum grafting and ridge augmentation. AlloDerm® has been successfully documented for more than ten years of dental applications.
BONE GRAFTING
When a tooth is lost, the surrounding bone is absorbed in to the body through a process called resorption. Oftentimes, patients who are interested in dental implants must first undergo a bone grafting procedure in order to rebuild the bone in the impacted area to receive the implant root. Dr. Javadi specializes in onlay bone block grafting; a technique where the bone graft is applied to the outside of the recipient’s bones to repair deterioration.

Dr. H. Javadi then utilizes Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR,) which uses barrier membranes to direct the growth of new bone, to restore your jaw bone to its full capacity.
PINHOLE TECHNIQUE
Periodontal Bone Graft

The best material for a bone graft is your own bone, which most likely will come from your chin, the back part of your lower jaw or your hip bone. The hip is considered to be a better source because the hip bone has a lot of marrow, which contains bone-forming cells. There are also synthetic materials that can be used for bone grafting. To place the removed bone in the recipient site, little holes are drilled in the existing bone to cause bleeding. This is done because blood provides cells that help the bone heal. The block of bone that was removed will be anchored in place with titanium screws. A mixture of the patient's bone marrow and some other bone-graft material will then be placed around the edges of the bone block. Finally, a membrane is placed over the area and the incision closed. The bone graft will take about 6 to 12 months to heal before dental implants can be placed. At that time, the titanium screws used to anchor the bone block in place will be removed before the implant is placed.

Soft Tissue Grafting
Soft Tissue Grafting

A frequent periodontal condition is known as gum recession. This means the existing gum tissue has receded up or down the root of the tooth exposing various amounts of the root. Root exposure can create root sensitivity especially to hot and cold, an increased potential for root decay, and/or esthetic concerns. Gum grafting procedures are the treatment of choice to prevent the recession from continuing further. There are many different types of recession and hence many different types of gum grafting. Some are aimed at covering the root of the tooth and other procedures are focused on providing an excellent new zone of gum tissue to halt the recession.

Bone Grafting

Bone grafting is commonly performed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon to replace or augment bone in areas of tooth loss. Bone grafting to the jaws and facial structures may be necessary in a wide variety of scenarios. The most common bone grafts are facial skeleton and jaw procedures. Other common procedures include tooth extraction site graft, bone graft reconstruction and for a sinus lift. Shrinkage of bone often occurs when a tooth is lost due to trauma, severe caries, or periodontal disease. Additionally, bone loss may have already occurred due to infection or pathology around a tooth. There are many artificial biocompatible bone substitutes available; however, the best material for a bone graft is your own bone, which most likely will come from your chin, the back part of your lower jaw or your hip bone. The hip is considered to be a better source because the hip bone has a lot of marrow, which contains bone-forming cells. There are also synthetic materials that can be used for bone grafting. Most bone grafts use a person's own bone, possibly in combination with other materials.

To place the removed bone in the recipient site, little holes are drilled in the existing bone to cause bleeding. This is done because blood provides cells that help the bone heal. The block of bone that was removed will be anchored in place with titanium screws. A mixture of the patient's bone marrow and some other bone-graft material will then be placed around the edges of bone block. Finally, a membrane is placed over the area and the incision closed.

The bone graft will take about 6 to 12 months to heal before dental implants can be placed. At that time, the titanium screws used to anchor the bone block in place will be removed before the implant is placed.

Sinus Graft

In the back of the upper jaw bone dental implants are frequently needed. In order for a dental implant to be successful in this area of the mouth there must be sufficient bone height and width to connect (integrate) to the dental implant. When the upper back teeth are lost and not replaced the sinus cavity becomes enlarged destroying any bone that is left behind. This very large sinus is like a "giant air pocket" and not capable of supporting an implant. A procedure known as sinus grafting (sinus lift) is performed to create bone that will ultimately hold the implants within the sinus. Sinus grafting is an extremely common form of bone grafting.

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